Bachelor Part 2: Finding Love in Rural America

In last week’s blog, ABC’s ‘Bachelor’ Chris Soules Says Iowa Has No Women, I called out the current king of reality TV, Chris Soules, on his hometown insecurities. Soules’ fears of not finding a woman willing to be a farm wife may hold some truth. However, I refuse to wave the white flag of surrender just yet. Does anyone else get the urge to stand up and holler, “Wait! You forgot about me!”?

As I said before, I think the issue lies in the geographic distribution of women. We’re here, Chris. You just gotta find us. Or we gotta find you, before you marry one of those hoity-toity girls who knows nothing more about farming than its inaccurate stereotypes. Someone needs to warn them! If I were Whitney, would I really want to sacrifice my fulfilling career as a fertility nurse? Granted, Arlington could use a few more babies, but…

Every single one of the women on the show needs to read Melissa Navinskey’s blog, “Born to Pharm” in order to understand what they’re truly vying for. Whether you’re a farmer’s wife, girlfriend, fiance, or none of the above, you’ll get a good a chuckle out of this blog. It’s a pretty realistic recap of the struggles farm wives face.

Link: The Truth About Being a Farm Wife

Back to the problem, though. Young farm men don’t know where to look for a wife, or even a good date. This recent Des Moines Register feature suggests online dating sites as a possible outlet. Essex, Iowa is only 40 minutes from my hometown. This problem is real.

Link: Farmers Face Challenges Finding Love

Young farmers need to be searching for the young women who consider the rewards of farm life greater than the disadvantages. Guys, stop falling for the dolled-up hair and makeup. That mascara will run when you stick her in a grain bin and tell her to start scooping. No Starbucks in your 40-mile radius? Suck it up, sweetie. Go for the girl who doesn’t complain when her Friday night date takes place in a tractor. She’s the real winner.

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